Thursday, February 2, 2012

malacca description in Suma Oriental by Tome Pires.

"This king Mansur Syah built the beautiful mosque which used to be where now is the famous fortress of Malacca and which was the finest known in these parts; and he ordered bridges, richly elaborated, to be built over the river."
Suma oriental, page 249 by Tome Pires

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Description of The Sultanate Palace in The Malay Annals

Adapun akan Sultan Mansur Syah pun pindahlah, tiada mahu diam lagi pada istana
tempat Hang Jebat mati itu. Maka baginda memberi titah kepada Bendahara Paduka Raja,
menyuruh membuat istana. Maka Bendahara Seri dia mengadap dia, kerana adat Bendahara
pegangannya Bintan. Adapun besar istana itu tujuh belas ruang, pada seruang tiga-tiga depa
luasnya; besar tiangnya sepemuluk, tujuh pangkat kemuncaknya. Pada antara itu diberinya
berkapa-kapa, pada antara kapa-kapa itu diberinya bumbungan melintang dan bergajahmenyusu;
sekaliannya bersayap layang-layang, sekaliannya itu diukir dan berscngkuap. Pada
antara Serigkuap itu diperbuatnya belalang bersagi; sekaliannya dicat dengan air emas.
Kemuncaknya kaca merah, apabila kena sinar matahari, bemyala-nyala rupanya seperti
manikam. Akan dinding istana itu sekaliannya berkambi, maka ditarupali dengan cermin
China yang besar, apabila kena panas matahari bemyala-nyala rupanya, kilau-kilauan tiada
nyata benar dipandang orang. Adapun rasuk istana itu kulim, sehasta lebamya, dan sejengkal
tiga jari tebalnya. Akan birai istana itu dua hasta lebamya, dan tebalnya sehasta, diukimya
rembatan pintu istana itu empat puluh banyaknya, semuanya bercat dengan air emas. Terlalu
indah perbuatan istana itu, sebuah pun istana raja yang di bawah angin ini tiada sepertinya
pada zaman itu. Istana itulah yang dinamai orang 'Mahligai Hawa Nafsu'; atapnya tembaga
dan timah disiripkan.
-Sulalatus Salatin by A Samad Ahmad

Thursday, November 17, 2011

“MULTI-DIMENSIONAL NETWORKING: FIFTEENTH-CENTURY INDIAN OCEAN MARITIME DIASPORA IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN PERSPECTIVE” BY KENNETH R. HALL*

Melaka’s Fifteenth-Century Multi-Ethnic Community


The description of Malacca by Ma Huan in Ying Yai Sheng Lan Chio chu

On the south-east ( corrected - should be south-west) of the country is the great sea; on the north-west ( corrected- should be north-east) the sea-shore adjoins the mountains. All is sandy, saltish land. The climate is hot by day, cold by night. The fields are infertile and the crops are poor and the people seldom practice agriculture.
There is one large river whose water flow down past the front of the king's residence to enter the sea; over the river, the king has constructed a wooden bridge, on which are built more than twenty bridge-pavilions, and all the trading in every article takes place on this bridge.

Images/old maps scanned from a book titled " The stadhuys of malacca- the proposal restoration"








Thursday, October 20, 2011

malacca description by chinese explorer

Written accounts by the Chinese recorded that the city was surrounded by a palisade with 4 gates and watch towers. Inside the city wall was a 2nd fortress where money, godowns and provisions were housed. The hill on the south side was where the sultan and his court lived. The main mosque was also situated on the hill. A bridge connected the north and south side with a marketplace contained in a structure of 20 pavilions where commodities of all sorts were sold. North of the river, lived the merchants who were grouped into separate ethnic communities according to their countries of origin. Rich merchants had offices in the city but maintained residence outside the town walls which were staffed with slaves and servants. Beautifully manicured gardens and orchards separated these merchants from the man-on -the- street and to further enhance their position, they wore 'robes of honour'.